FAQ Obstetrics

Congratulations! You will need to make two appointments. Your first appointment can be made as early as you like and will consist of routine lab work and meeting with a nurse to review your prior medical history. Your second appointment can be made between 6-12 weeks and will feature your first obstetric appointment with Dr. Fulton as well as your first ultrasound. After your first obstetric visit, you will follow-up every four weeks until you reach 28 weeks. Beginning at 28 weeks you can expect to attend obstetric visits every two weeks until you reach 36 weeks. Once you reach your final month, 36 weeks, you will be seen in the office every week until delivery.
One of the benefits of a small practice is in knowing that Dr. Fulton will personally deliver your baby.
Our practice delivers at St Dominic Hospital and Central Mississippi Medical Center.
Yes, you may dye your hair after the first trimester. While there are very few studies of hair dye use in human pregnancy, animal studies have shown no adverse effects. Many women have dyed their hair during pregnancy with no reported harmful outcomes. Only a minimal amount of hair dye is absorbed through the scalp after application and this small amount is unlikely to harm your baby. If you dye your hair with a single process and you’d like to be especially cautious, wait until after the first trimester to dye your hair. Highlights should be fine at any time since hair dye is not applied directly to the scalp. For more information: http://www.otispregnancy.org./files/hairtreatments.pdf
It is advisable for most women to continue a regular exercise program during pregnancy. However, you should not start a training program for a major event or add anything more strenuous. Be especially mindful to hydrate well. You do not have to monitor your heart rate, but you should exercise at a pace that allows you to converse while exercising. Avoid activities with a risk of falling or injury such as skiing or contact sports. Do not exercise in excessively hot conditions.
Air travel during most uncomplicated pregnancies is generally considered safe until 36 weeks. While flying, drink plenty of fluids and promote circulation by walking the aisles or moving ankles and legs frequently. Distance travel within an automobile should also be considered safe for most uncomplicated pregnancies until 36 weeks gestation: the same precautions for walking and stretching the legs at least every 2 hours should also be incorporated into any automobile trips. Please be aware that if you are planning on travel via a cruise line, most cruises will not accept pregnant passengers after 24 weeks gestation.
Listeria: do not eat unpasteurized soft cheeses such as brie, feta, blue, goat, or camembert. Avoid hot dogs and deli meats. Do not eat smoked or raw fish. Mercury: Do not eat Shark, Swordfish, King Mackeral, or Tilefish as they contain high levels of mercury. You may eat up to 12 ounces a week of lower mercury fish and shellfish. Toxoplasmosis: Do not eat raw or uncooked meat. Also, avoid changing the cat litter and wear gloves when gardening or handling soil.
Low to moderate caffeine consumption during pregnancy is considered safe. Pregnant women should limit their caffeine intake to less than 200 mg/day (roughly one to two cups of coffee). Although research results have been conflicting, a few studies have suggested an increased risk of miscarriage with high caffeine intake (more than 200-300 mg/day).
Link to form regarding Over the Counter Medicines in Pregnancy Is it safe to paint or be around paint fumes while I’m pregnant? It is highly unlikely
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